Love, Nature and Conquest in Macmillan’s Magazine

By Jordan Osterman Love and nature are two of the most timeless and ancient forces humans have maintained a relationship with, so it is no surprise to find both topics a common theme of poetry in the Victorian era, including in the works of noted poet Christina Rossetti. As Linda Hughes points out, love especially…

Victorian Family Magazines and the Elasticity of Time in Aurora Floyd

by Kaari Newman The notion of destiny runs throughout Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Aurora Floyd. On the one hand, it provides the all-important element of foreshadowing, a vital ingredient to keep readers in suspense of what will happen and prompt them to buy the next installment of the serial. On the other, it offers Braddon the…

“So Sped the Time”: Waiting and Interrupting in Victorian Women’s Periodicals

by Amy Valine What can a young woman do when confronted with the opportunity to transcend the boundaries of domestic temporality and actively manipulate time, rather than merely submit to it as inevitable? According to “Only a Flirtation” (1881) and “Madge Smith’s Revenge” (1895), two short stories appearing in Young Ladies’ Reader and Women’s Life,…

Layers of Containment in George Eliot’s “The Lifted Veil”

by Chelcy Walker Mark Turner’s article “Periodical Time in the Nineteenth Century” foregrounds his discussion of media time by highlighting one of the challenges that readers and writers of periodicals faced, namely that “time [was] a significant problem of nineteenth-century industrialized, urban modernity.”[1] Time, in both realistic and paranormal forms, is a significant theme in…